Monographs

2012

A Note on a Medallion of Antoninus Pius from Neapolis: The Largest Medallion Minted in Palestine
A Note on a Medallion of Antoninus Pius from Neapolis: The Largest Medallion Minted in Palestineby Robert Deutsch. Israel Numismatic Journal, Vol 17, 2009-10

During the reign of Antoninius Pius, the adopted son of Hadrian, the massive minting of city coinage in Palestine is represented in Neapolis by a series of coins that includes a medallion which appears to be the largest ever minted in Palestine.

2010

Roman Coins Boast “Judaea Capta”
Roman Coins Boast “Judaea Capta”by Robert Deutsch. Biblical Archaeology Review, Jan/Feb 2010, pp. 51-53

Despite Judea’s minute size within the empire, suppression of the Great Jewish Revolt of 66–70 C.E. required a massive Roman military force and generated the largest number of commemorative victory coins. But the Roman mint does not alone account for the large number of Judea Capta coins. The Jews had dared to mint their own.

2009

Tracking Down Shebnayahu, Servant of the King
Tracking Down Shebnayahu, Servant of the Kingby Robert Deutsch. Biblical Archaeology Review, 35:03, May/Jun 2009

How an antiquities market find solved a 42-year-old excavation puzzle.

2007

A Further Lead Weight of Shimon Bar Kokhba
A Further Lead Weight of Shimon Bar Kokhbaby Robert Deutsch. Israel Numismatic Journal, 15, 2003-6

A lead weight bearing the name of Shimon son of Kosba was published by this author in 2001. A further specimin, with a damaged Paleo-Hebrew inscription and a palm branch, is the subject of this article.

2006

Western Area M (The 1998-2000 Seasons) Israel Finkelstein, David Ussishkin and Robert Deutsch
Western Area M (The 1998-2000 Seasons) Israel Finkelstein, David Ussishkin and Robert Deutschby Robert Deutsch. Megiddo IV: The 1998-2002 Seasons, Volume 1

The work at Megiddo’s Area M in 1998-2000 clarified stratigraphic and chronological issues related to Gottlieb Schumacher’s excavation of 1903-05, specifically the date of the Nordburg and Chamber f located to its south.

2004

Two personal Hebrew seals
Two personal Hebrew sealsby Robert Deutsch. Teshurot LaAvishur: Studies in the Bible and the Ancient Near East in Hebrew and Semitic Languages, 2004

Two personal Hebrew seals of exceptional quality and interest – one of red carnelian, the other of white and brown banded agate – have recently surfaced on the Israel antiquities market.

2003

The Personal Seal and a Bulla of ‘Kushi, son of Toba’’
The Personal Seal and a Bulla of ‘Kushi, son of Toba’’by Robert Deutsch. Michmanim, June 2003, Pp 11-14

The Reuben and Edith Hecht Museum houses one of the world’s most important collections of West Semitic personal seals. The collection includes 140 different seals, impressions on jar handles, all recently published in a handsome catalog. Of special interest is seal no. 44 ‘Belonging to Kushi, son of Toba’, a Judean Hebrew personal seal made of brown limestone. It has a scaraboid shape and is perforated lengthwise.

2002

Lasting Impressions: New bullae reveal Egyptian-style emblems on Judah’s royal seals
Lasting Impressions: New bullae reveal Egyptian-style emblems on Judah’s royal sealsby Robert Deutsch. Biblical Archaeology Review, Volume 28, Number 4, July/August 2002, Pp 42-51, 60

Yigael Yadin (1917-1984), one of Israel’s pre-eminent archaeologists, asserted that the l’melekh stamps represent royal emblems. Some scholars have doubted this, but these bullae end the debate and prove Yadin correct. The article is the cover story of the July/August 2002 issue of Biblical Archaeology Review.

A Lead Weight of Hadrian: The Prototype for the Bar Kokhba Weights
A Lead Weight of Hadrian: The Prototype for the Bar Kokhba Weightsby Robert Deutsch. Israel Numismatic Journal, Vol. 14, 2000-2, Pp 125-128

The monumental numismatic work, The Coinage of the Bar Kokhba War, written by my teacher, the late Dr. Leo Mildenberg, is to date the most important and complete corpus on the subject. I am therefore pleased to offer this modest contribution regarding the metrology of the Bar Kokhba weight standards.

2001

A Lead Weight of Shimon Bar Kokhba
A Lead Weight of Shimon Bar Kokhbaby Robert Deutsch. Israel Exploration Journal, Volume 51, Number 1, 2001, Pp 96-9

This is the fourth lead weight belonging to the Bar Kokhba administration that has been recorded to date. While the three previously published weights bear Hebrew inscriptions in square Jewish script, the weight under discussion is unique regarding its palaeo-Hebrew script.

1999

Five Unrecorded ‘Yehud’ Silver Coins
Five Unrecorded ‘Yehud’ Silver Coinsby Robert Deutsch. Israel Numismatic Journal, #13, 1994-1999, Pp 25-6

These five coins enlarge the corpus to the impressive number of 56 types and variants. Among them is the first Jewish coin featuring – a human ear.

A Royal Ammonite Seal Impression
A Royal Ammonite Seal Impressionby Robert Deutsch. Michael: Historical, Epigraphical and Biblical Studies in Honor of Prof. Michael Heltzer, 1999

This minute black clay bulla bears the seal impression of Barak’el the king of Ammon.

Seal of Ba’alis Surfaces
Seal of Ba’alis Surfacesby Robert Deutsch. Biblical Archaeology Review, March/April 1999, Pp. 46-9, 66

Just as archaeological discoveries flesh out Israelite history, so they also tell us about Israel’s neighbors — and sometime enemies.

1998

First Impression: What We Learn from King Ahaz’s Seal
First Impression: What We Learn from King Ahaz’s Sealby Robert Deutsch. Biblical Archaeology Review, July 1998, Pp. 54-56, 62

It’s time to give Biblical Archaeology Review readers a look at the first seal impression of a Hebrew king ever found.

1997

Numismatic Evidence from the Persian Period from the Sharon Plain
Numismatic Evidence from the Persian Period from the Sharon Plainby Robert Deutsch. Transeuphratene, Vol 13, 1997, Pp 17-20

The Phoenician and Aramaic votive inscriptions from the 5th century BCE published in 1994 originate from the site of Eliachin in the central Sharon plain in Israel. These inscriptions reveal strong evidence of the Phoenician and Persian presence in the Sharon.

‘Abday on Eleventh-Century BCE Arrowheads
‘Abday on Eleventh-Century BCE Arrowheadsby Robert Deutsch. Israel Exploration Journal, Volume 47, Numbers 1-2, 1997, Pp. 111-2

In a previous issue of Israel Exploration Journal, Professor F.M. Cross Jr. challenged our proposed reading hs kty // msl ‘bdy “Arrow of Kittian ruler of ‘Abday”, which we published in 1994. Instead of the personal name ‘bdy (‘Abday), Cross argued that the inscription on a mid-eleventh-century arrowhead refers to ‘bdn (‘Abdon), which he identified as Khirbet ‘Abdeh, a ruin situated 5km east of Akhzib, in northern Israel. It is true that from the contextual point of view, msl ‘bdn (the ruler of + a typonym) would be preferable to msi ‘hdy (the ruler of PN), but Cross’s main objection to our reading was based on palaeographic grounds, having been misled by the poor-quality photograph that we originally published.

1996

A ‘Babylonian’ Grave from Megiddo’s Area F
A ‘Babylonian’ Grave from Megiddo’s Area Fby Robert Deutsch. Megiddo III: The 1992-1996 Seasons, Pp. 424-428

This bottle was found lying at the left side of the skull. It is probably an import from a Babylonian glazing production centre.

1993

A Unique Prutah from the First Year of the Jewish War Against Rome
A Unique Prutah from the First Year of the Jewish War Against Romeby Robert Deutsch. Israel Numismatic Journal, Volume 12, 1992-3, Pp 71-72

In 1538, Guillaume Postel first showed the Samaritan script on a Jewish shekel. Since then, shekels and other coins of the Jewish War against Rome (66-70) have become well known.

1991

Six Unrecorded ‘Yehud’ Silver Coins
Six Unrecorded ‘Yehud’ Silver Coinsby Robert Deutsch. Israel Numismatic Journal, Vol 11, 1990-1, Pp 4-6

Very few Judean coins from the fourth century BC were known until 1966. Since then, however, the rich and fascinating material that has become known has changed the situation entirely.

1987

A Portrait Coin of Agrippa II Reconsidered
A Portrait Coin of Agrippa II Reconsideredby Robert Deutsch. Israel Numismatic Journal, Vol 9, 1986-7

The coin type with anchor, formerly attributed to the reign of Agrippa II, can now be safely listed with the issues of Agrippa I.